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JOSEPH KNIBB OXON FECIT. A beautiful Charles II period miniature brass lantern clock by this famous clockmaker.

JOSEPH KNIBB OXON FECIT. A beautiful Charles II period miniature brass lantern clock by this famous clockmaker. JOSEPH KNIBB OXON FECIT. A beautiful Charles II period miniature brass lantern clock by this famous clockmaker. JOSEPH KNIBB OXON FECIT. A beautiful Charles II period miniature brass lantern clock by this famous clockmaker.
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JOSEPH KNIBB OXON FECIT. A beautiful Charles II period miniature brass lantern clock by this famous clockmaker.

Origin
Oxford
Date
circa 1670

A beautiful Charles II period miniature brass lantern clock by this famous clockmaker.

This little clock has very pleasing proportions and retains both its original doors, backplate, hoop and spurs. It is a very early example of a miniature lantern clock and was made just before Joseph Knibb moved from Oxford to London. With its narrow chapter ring and sparse sword hilt half-hour markers this would probably have been one of the first lantern clocks he made.

The dial centre is filled with exquisitely engraved tulip flowers and leaves and the alarm setting disc is engraved with a central Tudor Rose and an outer band of Arabic hour numerals.

The well patinated brass case  has flower and dolphin frets and an original bell strap with pierced foliate shaped ‘arms’ or ‘leaves’The maker’s signature Joseph Knibb Oxon Fecit is engraved along the bottom of the front intertwining foliate and dolphin fret.

The short duration movement retains its original knife edge verge escapement and has a striking train for the hours on a countwheel in place of the original alarm train, a change probably made early on in the 18th century.

Height: 7 ½  in (19 cm) excluding finial

                 8 ⅞ in (22.5 cm) including finial

Width: 3 ½ in (8.75 cm)

Depth: 4 in (10.25 cm)

* Joseph Knibb is widely regarded as one of England’s most innovative and finest clockmakers. He made very few lantern clocks as they were probably not cost effective in terms of time and value relative to his more important productions. Such clocks were mostly destined for the servants’ quarters or pantries. Today they have great folkloric appeal and they are very easy to accommodate given their miniature proportions. This clock is both rare and early and was made just prior to Joseph Knibb leaving Oxford to set up his new business in London in 1671

HW6244

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